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Guest Post: Bryan Alexander’s Thoughts Turn to Winter in July

As our third guest blogger, I’m delighted to have my friend and teacher, Bryan Alexander, a leading thinker on digital media–see his wonderful new book, The New Digital Storytelling and follow him on Twitter (if you can keep up!)–, a blogger on all things gothic, and a homesteader who  lives 20 minutes from me but […]

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Seasonal and Creative Berry Desserts

Last Thursday we taught our first class of the summer, Beyond Pie: Desserts with Small Fruits and Berries to introduce people to new, unconventional ways to use berries in desserts. While pies, crisps, cobblers and crumbles are all delicious ways to use berries, we wanted to encourage our participants to be creative and not to […]

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It’s Fig Season

On Saturday we found the first figs of the season in our local co-op and on Sunday we picked our own ripe figs (far superior in flavor and texture to the store-bought). A month ago we wrote about the wonder of being able to grow figs in Vermont, and now we’re finally able to eat […]

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Growing Figs in Vermont: Spring Fever

Cross-posted at Eating Well Magazine. We’ve reached the turning point–the fields and woods have shrugged off their winter torpor and are decking themselves out in glorious shades of green. The female coyote who hunts in our back field is clearly a nursing mother; the birdboxes all have residents; the turtles are digging holes to lay […]

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Gardening in a Time of Climate Chaos

Last month was the wettest April on record in these parts. And right now May isn’t exactly feeling dry. Lake Champlain has reached record levels; the rivers leap from their banks; the fields are soggy.  Even our pond which never ever floods is making noises about heading out over its banks and down to the […]

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On Volunteerism in the Vegetable Garden

Published in the Addison Independent PATCHwork Column 4/21/11 Some call them uninvited guests, interlopers, opportunists, ne’er-do-wells, even weeds. Earnest gardeners work hard at banishing these trespassers from vegetable beds, pulling them in fall and spring, evicting them when they pop up during the summer. It makes sense, I suppose. If left to their druthers, they’ll […]

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Spring All At Once

It’s warm outside—warm—and has been for three days.  A thunderstorm blew through this morning, and the grass is responding with green, the trees with buds, the birds with song. The phoebes and flickers are back; the peepers sang for the first time last night. I’ve finally informed the birds that gleaning season is done in […]

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Spring Cleaning: Additions to Open View Gardens and a New Recipe

Looking out the window right now, I’m hard pressed to declare winter’s demise.  It is snowing … on April 4.  And it’s windy.  Raw. Not nice at all, especially when I want to get outside and start planting some things under the tunnels!  My garden notes from last year tell me that it was HOT […]

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Slow Gardening: Adapting to Conditions Out of Our Control

I’m sure there are a number of April Fool’s posts about the snow falling in New England right now.  But I’m taking a different tack on April and a slow spring with this week’s column for the Addison Independent. Slow Gardening: Spring Takes its Time, and So Does the Garden As spring hems and haws […]

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More Signs of Spring

Because we have one big winter storm forecast for Friday–naturally on April Fool’s–I thought it important to keep thinking spring: Down by the front stream

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