Archive | Garden RSS feed for this archive

Vegetables and Fruit Everywhere But Not a One to Eat

When I travel, I seek out farmers’ markets and food shops as much as museums and historic sites, hoping for the unique and telling glimpses into a culture offered by hanging about where people buy their food. And so in Montreal this past weekend, yes, the unforgettable Jean-Paul Gauthier show at the Museum of Fine […]

Continue Reading

On Gardening Fatigue: Moving through the Ides of July

My sister-in-law is about to come down with a bad case of mid-summer gardening fatigue. I can sense it creeping up on her—and many others– as it does every year right about now, just as the birds are quieting down from their early nesting hoopla, just as the sun hits its warm stride, just as […]

Continue Reading

Strawberry Weekend

At Open View Gardens, our weekend revolved around strawberries. Since this year we can’t pick any of our own strawberries in order to encourage the 50 first-year plants to send their energy to their roots (which will lead to healthier, more robust plants and higher yields next year), we decided to go to The Last […]

Continue Reading

Minding the Gap: The Gardener in Mid-June

I’m trying to break a bad gardening habit. I’m trying to resist the urge to over-plant, to stuff the vegetable beds to bursting point no matter how good it makes me feel. You see, when visitors ask for a tour of my gardens, I do a lot of apologizing– for the small size of the […]

Continue Reading

Travels to LA and Back: Connections to the Earth

I’m just back from a short visit with good friends in Los Angeles–leaving these rural acres from time to time for urban settings shakes things up, expands my sense of the world and helps me see my Vermont life.   That our friends love good food of all sorts also meant we were in for […]

Continue Reading

Growing the Wild Within the Orchard Walls

Addison Independent PATCHwork Column for May 12, 2011 Kerplink Kerplank Kerplunk When I was a child, those sounds–berries hitting the bottom of a tin pail in Robert McCloskey’s Blueberries for Sal—echoed through the blueberry field behind our Maine cottage.  I spent almost as much time looking for signs of Sal’s blueberry-ing bear as I did […]

Continue Reading

Growing Figs in Vermont: Spring Fever

Cross-posted at Eating Well Magazine. We’ve reached the turning point–the fields and woods have shrugged off their winter torpor and are decking themselves out in glorious shades of green. The female coyote who hunts in our back field is clearly a nursing mother; the birdboxes all have residents; the turtles are digging holes to lay […]

Continue Reading

Gardening in a Time of Climate Chaos

Last month was the wettest April on record in these parts. And right now May isn’t exactly feeling dry. Lake Champlain has reached record levels; the rivers leap from their banks; the fields are soggy.  Even our pond which never ever floods is making noises about heading out over its banks and down to the […]

Continue Reading

On Volunteerism in the Vegetable Garden

Published in the Addison Independent PATCHwork Column 4/21/11 Some call them uninvited guests, interlopers, opportunists, ne’er-do-wells, even weeds. Earnest gardeners work hard at banishing these trespassers from vegetable beds, pulling them in fall and spring, evicting them when they pop up during the summer. It makes sense, I suppose. If left to their druthers, they’ll […]

Continue Reading

Garden Lessons:Not All Broccoli is Created Equal

Cross-posted at Eating Well Magazine. And here, for all these years, I thought raised beds were the way to go… I’m reading an interesting (and controversial) book about gardening in post-peak-oil times: Gardening When It Counts, by Steve Solomon. He  would have me abandon my intensive gardening techniques including the raised beds (the soil dries […]

Continue Reading